Jump to content


Photo

What is the down-side of re-programming the car's computer to think that there is no DPF (even if there is one)?


  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 ship69

ship69

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 253 posts
  • Name:John Smith
  • Car :'08 i-DTEC EX man 5D
  • LocationUK

Posted 20 December 2018 - 10:36 PM

Hello

 

What is the down-side of reprogramming the car's computer so that "it thinks that there is no DPF", even if there in fact is one?

 

Would the car create less soot (AKA 'particles') and no longer need to do a regeneration to burn the soot off?

Would there no longer be any need to drive at motorway speeds in order to clean out the engine?

Is such a thing detectable during an MOT?

 

Cheers

J

 

 

 


Honda Accord Tourer (2007), 2.2 litre diesel, i-CTDI
Premier Tuning - Stage 1 (180bhp)

#2 edgeoftime

edgeoftime

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,867 posts
  • Name:John Hamer
  • Car :11 idtec tourer ex.
  • LocationWaltham Abbey Essex

Posted 21 December 2018 - 09:20 AM

Leave it alone, I reckon they made a good job of it!  When they built the car.


Edited by edgeoftime, 21 December 2018 - 09:22 AM.


#3 DazTheMe

DazTheMe

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 70 posts
  • Name:Darren
  • Car :Accord 2.2i Dtec
  • LocationUnited Kingdom

Posted 21 December 2018 - 10:05 AM

Just mapping the DPF out of the ecu if its still connected would produce the same amount of particulate, the DPF would still catch the same amount of particulate, except when it gets full, it won't know it's full, so the ecu won't add extra fuel to increase combustion temperature to burn off the excess soot in the DPF. Relying on a passive regen wouldn't work either. So what you'd be left with is a DPF that is filling up at the same rate as a car that knows it's got a DPF but without the ECU intervening when soot levels get too high.

So instead of a DPF light coming on, I'd imagine you'd have a turbo related issue or unable to start the car when the engine is literally choking on its own fumes when they just blowback from the DPF that will eventually get 100% clogged up.

This is only my personal opinion, I'm no mechanic.

Edited by DazTheMe, 21 December 2018 - 10:07 AM.


#4 ship69

ship69

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 253 posts
  • Name:John Smith
  • Car :'08 i-DTEC EX man 5D
  • LocationUK

Posted 21 December 2018 - 12:30 PM

Leave it alone, I reckon they made a good job of it!  When they built the car.

 

If there's one thing I know it's that this is not true.

My DPF has now failed twice, and with massive difficulties being incurred by mechanics who have attempted to rectify the problem - including, I may say a moon-lighting Honda mechanic. 

 

And worse, with just the DPF sensor being £400+, and new DPF being over £1000+ without the catalytic converter, the replacement parts for a Honda seem to be off-the-scale expensive.
 


Honda Accord Tourer (2007), 2.2 litre diesel, i-CTDI
Premier Tuning - Stage 1 (180bhp)

#5 ship69

ship69

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 253 posts
  • Name:John Smith
  • Car :'08 i-DTEC EX man 5D
  • LocationUK

Posted 21 December 2018 - 12:31 PM

Just mapping the DPF out of the ecu if its still connected would produce the same amount of particulate...

...This is only my personal opinion, I'm no mechanic.

 

This is precisely my concern. Can anyone here confirm this?

Cheers

J


Honda Accord Tourer (2007), 2.2 litre diesel, i-CTDI
Premier Tuning - Stage 1 (180bhp)

#6 F6HAD

F6HAD

    Affiliate / Co-Founder

  • Administrators
  • 12,918 posts
  • Name:Fahad
  • Car :2015 Audi A6
  • LocationHalifax

Posted 21 December 2018 - 12:36 PM

In short you run the risk of it either catching fire or destroying the turbo and engine.

There are no shortcuts, I keep saying this for a reason.. because there aren’t any.
Posted Image
Mobile Engine Chiptuning & Remapping Specialists

Cars tuned from £199 at base + Enquire about our DPF & EGR OFF services

info@premiertuning.com or Facebook

#7 Bounder

Bounder

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 396 posts
  • Name:Huan
  • Car :Accord Type S CW3
  • LocationCo Cork Ireland

Posted 21 December 2018 - 01:50 PM

A DPF  is a filter, an expensive filter and a self cleaning (to a degree) filter but at the end of the day all filters need to be replaced whether they are air oil or fuel or exhaust. 

I am of the opinion that these are only a band aid fix for diesels, and are harmful to engine longevity and performance.

Just think about the boats that bring goods to the world one of them produces as much Nox and particulates as all the cars and trucks in Europe.



#8 F6HAD

F6HAD

    Affiliate / Co-Founder

  • Administrators
  • 12,918 posts
  • Name:Fahad
  • Car :2015 Audi A6
  • LocationHalifax

Posted 21 December 2018 - 04:11 PM

They call it a filter but it’s actuslly a trap, and it traps the particulates inside the honeycombe. By virtue of its design it has a limited life and will always fail at some point.

It’s not hondas fault at all, as you say it’s a sticky plaster solution and an afterthought in the Diesel engine design process.
Posted Image
Mobile Engine Chiptuning & Remapping Specialists

Cars tuned from £199 at base + Enquire about our DPF & EGR OFF services

info@premiertuning.com or Facebook

#9 ship69

ship69

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 253 posts
  • Name:John Smith
  • Car :'08 i-DTEC EX man 5D
  • LocationUK

Posted 21 December 2018 - 05:06 PM

By virtue of its designed, it has a limited life and will always fail at some point.
 

My car has done c. 100K miles.  I have just had my DPF send away and cleaned by some professionals who have some new, state-of-the-art DPF cleaning machine.

 

When you say it will always "fail" at some point, would getting it really well cleaned suffice?


Honda Accord Tourer (2007), 2.2 litre diesel, i-CTDI
Premier Tuning - Stage 1 (180bhp)

#10 F6HAD

F6HAD

    Affiliate / Co-Founder

  • Administrators
  • 12,918 posts
  • Name:Fahad
  • Car :2015 Audi A6
  • LocationHalifax

Posted 21 December 2018 - 06:10 PM

All you’re doing is delaying the inevitable. Nobody can offer you any guarantee in this regard, including Honda themselves. You may be better selling up and buying a petrol car if running a modern diesel is causing you so much inconvenience.
Posted Image
Mobile Engine Chiptuning & Remapping Specialists

Cars tuned from £199 at base + Enquire about our DPF & EGR OFF services

info@premiertuning.com or Facebook

#11 Tanna

Tanna

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 292 posts
  • Name:Tanna
  • Car :Accord
  • LocationMidlands

Posted 21 December 2018 - 07:48 PM

All you’re doing is delaying the inevitable. Nobody can offer you any guarantee in this regard, including Honda themselves. You may be better selling up and buying a petrol car if running a modern diesel is causing you so much inconvenience.

Fahad is right. Be careful with an aftermarket DPF as it will cause issues and keep a eye on the engine oil level as when it tries to regenerate itself the car overfuels itself resulting in the diesel fuel ending up in the engine. Best solution is to get the job sorted by Fahad and forget about DPF issues all together.



#12 stellamon

stellamon

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 78 posts
  • Name:Nick
  • Car :Accord 2.2i-DTEC
  • LocationShrewsbury

Posted 23 December 2018 - 01:22 AM

Hello

 

What is the down-side of reprogramming the car's computer so that "it thinks that there is no DPF", even if there in fact is one?

 

What would that possibly do to benefit the car?