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0W-30 or 5W-30


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#1 Grayedout

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Posted 18 May 2019 - 04:52 PM

Lost count of the number of times people have asked am I okay using a 5W-30 oil instead of the recommended 0W-30?

Well watch this video and note the difference, when cold, between the 0W and the 5W and imagine the difference this makes in how fast the oil gets to the vital components in the engine when you start it up.

When these two oil are warm then they will flow identically.

One of the main reason people want to use a 5W is because they are generally cheaper because it is harder & more expensive to create a 0W and so the prices are higher.

Hope this helps.

https://youtu.be/V5a4kP-5Jiw
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#2 stellamon

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Posted 19 May 2019 - 10:13 AM

I have been using 0w30 up until a few weeks ago when I used this instead, cos summers here:

 

https://www.ebay.co....igAAOSw~-Zcw2ZN

 

That vid must have been shot in a freezer


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#3 antdad

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Posted 19 May 2019 - 10:58 AM

@ Graham 

 

Not exactly telling the whole story is it? 

 

According to the comments that video was posted by The Siberian Society of Automotive Engineering so we can make an educated guess at the temperature that test was taken at.

 

5W is supposed to operate at -25 deg C whereas 0W is designed to operate well below that as stated in my Accord Tourer manual.


Edited by antdad, 19 May 2019 - 10:58 AM.


#4 Grayedout

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Posted 19 May 2019 - 12:46 PM

Correct but even at room temperature there will be a noticeable difference between the flow of a 0W verses a 5W.

I would prefer my oil to get around the engine as soon as possible at startup!

#5 stellamon

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Posted 19 May 2019 - 11:19 PM

This shows operating temperatures of an oil range or viscosity, temperatures have to be very low to impact parameters:

 

3PJ4M7T.png

 

 

I'm an advocate of using the specified oil and will probably go back to 0w30 in the winter, but it is very runny, whose to say that isn't a problem, if it runs off all the components quickly after shutdown leaving them unprotected on start up.


Edited by stellamon, 19 May 2019 - 11:28 PM.


#6 Grayedout

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Posted 20 May 2019 - 12:47 PM

That graph shows the working range but does not highlight the viscosity differences between a 0W and a 5W at low temperatures.


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#7 Channel Hopper

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Posted 25 May 2019 - 03:25 PM

Is that table in centigrade ? if so it appears to stop below temperatures an engine is designed to operate at.



#8 stellamon

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Posted 26 May 2019 - 09:25 AM

Yes the graph looks misleading so found this to help explain:

 

In a 10w-40 for example the 10w bit (W = winter, not weight or watt or anything else for that matter) simply means that the oil must have a certain maximum viscosity/flow at low temperature. The lower the "W" number the better the oil's cold temperature/cold start performance.

The 40 in a 10w-40 simply means that the oil must fall within certain viscosity limits at 100°C. This is a fixed limit and all oils that end in 40 must achieve these limits. Once again the lower the number, the thinner the oil: a 30 oil is thinner than a 40 oil at 100°C etc. 

 

Cold cranking viscosity limits, determined by the CCS, are defined in the SAE J300 Standard, as shown below:

 

Cold Crank Viscosity, Low temperature viscosity (mPa∙s) Max (CCS),  0W 6200 @ -35,  5W 6600 @ -30,  10W 7000 @ -25,  15W 7000 @ -20,   20W 9500 @ -15,  25W 13000 @ -10


Edited by stellamon, 26 May 2019 - 09:28 AM.