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Timing Anomally++


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#1 chesjak

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Posted 01 October 2019 - 07:10 AM

Hi

 

After a long (months and months) deliberation, I took the bull by the horns and started on replacing the timing chain and bits.

 

One thing I noticed was the position of the timing marks.

 

When all the (brass) coloured chain links are in the correct place and the camshaft cogs are in the correct place, the crankshaft gear mark should also line up with the pointer on the casing (according to the manual).

 

Mine doesn't.  The mark is two cogs to the right of the TDC pointer.

 

The car has not been giving any problems as far as timing is concerned and rund quite well but it does seem strange that everything doesn't line up as it is supposed to according to the manual.

 

I also noticed that ther are also white paint dots that someone has put in different places to line up by.

 

I bought the car before it had even reached its first full service mileage and since it is a pre facelift model the chain tensioner is surprisingly of the newer design.

 

Has anyone that has replaced the Timing chain had any anomalies like this?


Edited by chesjak, 01 October 2019 - 07:16 AM.


#2 Mr Honda

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Posted 04 October 2019 - 10:17 AM

http://typeaccord.co...-engine-chains/

 

I've no experience with these, above is just a diy link I found if it's of any use to you.



#3 chesjak

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Posted 05 October 2019 - 10:32 AM

Hi  Mr Honda

 

Thanks for your input.

 

I decided to put the new chain on exactly as the old one came off.

 

Got it all back together and thankfully the engine did start.

 

I was amased at the condition of the the chain and guides.

 

I have done 218k in the car and the chain hadn.t streched at all compared to the new one.  Only a slight amount of wear on the guides but the tensioner was nearly at its full travel.

 

I would like to put it down to the fact that I change the oil every 6K but probably not the reason.

 

One thing is for sure, although not technical, it was a very fiddly job and I don't wish to do it again.



#4 edgeoftime

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Posted 08 October 2019 - 08:37 AM

WELL DONE! I make you right about the oil changes, 12,000 is far too far. Does the old chain sag when held out horizontally? that is where the wear shows itself.


Edited by edgeoftime, 08 October 2019 - 08:38 AM.


#5 Grayedout

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Posted 09 October 2019 - 07:58 AM

 I agree 12,000 is too long.  I change mine at half that.

 

The reason I believe is this engine is quite ‘sooty’ and generates quite a lot of small carbon particles (soot) which get deposited in the oil.  The oil handles this using dispersant additives that hold these small particles in suspension but the oil only has so many of these and when they are all used up then the soot particles start to clump together into larger pieces that cause abrasive wear to the chain.

 

By changing the oil earlier it ensures it does not run out of dispersant additives and so all the soot is held in suspension in the oil and comes out with the drain.

 

Ever wondered why an oil goes black? Because it is full of soot particles held in suspension.



#6 Channel Hopper

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Posted 12 October 2019 - 06:03 PM

 I agree 12,000 is too long.  I change mine at half that.

 

The reason I believe is this engine is quite ‘sooty’ and generates quite a lot of small carbon particles (soot) which get deposited in the oil.  The oil handles this using dispersant additives that hold these small particles in suspension but the oil only has so many of these and when they are all used up then the soot particles start to clump together into larger pieces that cause abrasive wear to the chain.

 

By changing the oil earlier it ensures it does not run out of dispersant additives and so all the soot is held in suspension in the oil and comes out with the drain.

 

Ever wondered why an oil goes black? Because it is full of soot particles held in suspension.

Dirty deposits is why it is always worth looking at an engine flush once in a while.  Regular lubing is also the cheapest service one can carry out on an engine.

 

Rather than follow the usual formula and buy the recommended agent, just buy a cheap (er), disposable oil with similar properties as the ones recommended.

Drain the old oil out as much as you can -  running the engine to normal temperature and then leaving the drain bolt off over an few hours, additionaly alternately raising both left and right sides of the car on blocks to clear out the usual wells, keeping the original filter in. Put bolt back in and fill with the cheap oil to about the normal amount, though this really doesn't have to be accurate.

 

Run engine for about an hour in neutral, or take for a short burst on local roads for a few minutes until the engine temperature is in the middle of the gauge. Drive back and wait until you can just get near the sump without burning yourself (don't let her cool down fully)

 

Drain agan and peer into the blackness,  take out the old filter and empty all wells as before over the next few hours. Replace filter with new, replace drain bolt and fill with the quality oil.

 

Voila ! Another 100k of engine reliability for the same expense as a single 12000 mile service.


Edited by Channel Hopper, 12 October 2019 - 06:05 PM.