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Keihin Carb

jay559

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Hi does anyone know who can rebuild the keihin carb on my 1979 accord or a alternative to keihin, and how does upload pics on here
 

Channel Hopper

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Have you already taken it apart ?
Have you had it cleaned inside ?
Was there wear on any of the moving components ?


I have rebuilt many tens of Keihins for their motorcycles, and balanced/synchronised twins and banks of four.
 

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Unless it has significant wear to the emulsion tube, it should be rebuildable.

First stop would be to have it ultrasonically cleaned, and I'd imagine allens performance may be able to help you if it needs a needle or similar.
 

jay559

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Thanks alot for your replys, i dont really have a clue about carbs, but i will try allens performance.

Channel Hopper) so you must know ins n outs on these carbs, i have been interested in the mikuni with side drafts. can that be easly done or better stick to its original.
 

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jay559 said:
Channel Hopper) so you must know ins n outs on these carbs, i have been interested in the mikuni with side drafts. can that be easly done or better stick to its original.
What is the reason for you not being pleased with / taking apart the original carb ?

Unless the vehicle has beern standing for months, or you have been the victim of sugar in the tank there is very little that can wreck a carburetor completely, though careless dismantling is not unheard of.
 

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This car has been parked or stored for like 10 years, i did get it to fire up, but it was rough so i was thinking a carb clean up or rebuild may do it good i dont really have any experience with carbs, well before my era but i do remember people working on carb cars growing up in the 80's.

What would you suggest to do at this point.
 

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Get the carb ultrasonically cleaned.
 

Channel Hopper

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jay559 said:
This car has been parked or stored for like 10 years, i did get it to fire up, but it was rough so i was thinking a carb clean up or rebuild may do it good i dont really have any experience with carbs, well before my era but i do remember people working on carb cars growing up in the 80's.

What would you suggest to do at this point.
Ten years ?

What sort of temperatures (outside) during that time ?

You are looking at three variants of fuel decomposition, syrup (OK), crystalising (needs dismantlng) and corrosive activity (replacement). You need to take the thing apart and chip away at the non vial parts to look for pitting.

I do have a link to the chemical processes alloy experiences under benzine/additive attack somewhere, but it will take firing up a Macintosh I have not used for twenty years.

Start dismantling - carefully - in the meantime, using a really quality screwdriver set.
 

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I cannot find the original article which was linked to a local motorcycle shop that sadly closed a number of years back, but the link below does provide much of the effects that cause a fuel system's demise.

http://www.groups.tr-register.co.uk/wessex/ethanol-update.html

These two paragraphs are the clincher when it comes to stale 'modern' fuel

Ferrous metals are not the only ones to be adversely affected by Ethanol. Copper fuel pipes, brass fittings etc are also corroded. Moving parts in fuel pumps (including rubber diaphragms if they have them) are damaged. Fuel filters are rapidly blocked by the residue of all these reactions. Rubber petrol pipes will break down and crack leading to fuel leaks. Carburettors and the jets inside them are also corroded by Ethanol. Ethanol also attacks cork (often used as a gasket in older carburettors). Below is a list of materials known to be damaged by Ethanol…the list is not exhaustive.

Zinc and galvanised materials, Brass, Copper, Terne plate (lead/tin coated steel), Aluminium, Magnesium alloys, Zamak 5, Polyurethane, Polymers containing alcohol groups, Fibreglass-reinforced polyester and epoxy resins, Shellac, Acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), Polyvinyl Chloride flexible version (PVC), Natural rubber, Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET), Cork, Petseal, Nitrile rubber (NBR) [Buna N] with low acrylonitrile (CAN) content, Viton A, Polyamide 6 (PA 6) [Nylon 6], Polyamide 66 (PA 66) [Nylon 66].
 
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