What's new

Are diesel struts / shock absorbers different from petrol ?

Accord127

Member
Messages
46
Reaction score
2
Car
Accord diesel
Are diesel struts / shock absorbers different from petrol ? I know they have different part numbers but when i search for aftermarket struts e.g TRW, MONROE etc , they recommend same for diesel and petrol models. I remember once had diesel corolla the rod inside the shock absorber was thicker than its petrol counterpart.

P.s i feel every small bump on road, when i drive car. bump steer as well , they could be bad bushings or struts ?
 

Sajid Jafri

New Member
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Car
Accord 2.2 CTDI ex
Not sure, im looking for an answer to this to. Did u manage to find out if the shocks are the same on petrols and diesels?
 

Accord127

Member
Messages
46
Reaction score
2
Car
Accord diesel
i did not find the answer, but i put all four new KYB in. Car handles better now , rear ones have more thickness.
 

Richard B

Members
Messages
404
Reaction score
92
Location
Australia
Car
2006 Tourer
I don't know the answer to this specifically, but because I live somewhere where Honda only sold the petrol sedan version of the Accord, parts compatibility is something I look into consistently.

Cars are of course designed to mostly use parts from a contemporary "parts library", meaning that designing or specifying a custom part for a particular model is a last resort because it drives up the manufacturing cost of the car. Even picking parts from third party supplier catalogues are subject to economies of scale so unless engineering demands otherwise, it makes more sense to add e.g. a shock absorber you are already buying in volume.

The Diesel Accords (and especially wagons) were a low volume model compared to other Honda models and designers and engineers would have been under considerable pressure to use existing parts from current and previous Hondas.

Honda then obfuscates this natural cross-compatibility by giving parts unique part numbers that only relate to specific model cars. This is hugely frustrating.

Thankfully, many aftermarket product suppliers have systems online that can help sort out this mess.. somewhat. What you need to do is find the third party product or supplier code and then look for that number and see what turns up. Quite often you find that a particular part doesn't only for a range of other Hondas, but models from other brands. There is of course a slight risk that data entry errors have been made, so do cross check wherever you can.

I once proposed to start a cross compatibility database on a local Honda forum, which was met with some enthusiasm from other local "grey import" owners, but unfortunately the forum was shut down before that ever got off the ground. it is still toying in the back of my mind though. As Diesel Accords are being retired more and more, even UK owners will eventually want to know which alternative parts suit their cars.

Interesting things I found.. the diesel wagons run a host of brake parts from previous Hondas, and the turbocharger was also used by Renault on some of their models.
 

Accord127

Member
Messages
46
Reaction score
2
Car
Accord diesel
I don't know the answer to this specifically, but because I live somewhere where Honda only sold the petrol sedan version of the Accord, parts compatibility is something I look into consistently.

Cars are of course designed to mostly use parts from a contemporary "parts library", meaning that designing or specifying a custom part for a particular model is a last resort because it drives up the manufacturing cost of the car. Even picking parts from third party supplier catalogues are subject to economies of scale so unless engineering demands otherwise, it makes more sense to add e.g. a shock absorber you are already buying in volume.

The Diesel Accords (and especially wagons) were a low volume model compared to other Honda models and designers and engineers would have been under considerable pressure to use existing parts from current and previous Hondas.

Honda then obfuscates this natural cross-compatibility by giving parts unique part numbers that only relate to specific model cars. This is hugely frustrating.

Thankfully, many aftermarket product suppliers have systems online that can help sort out this mess.. somewhat. What you need to do is find the third party product or supplier code and then look for that number and see what turns up. Quite often you find that a particular part doesn't only for a range of other Hondas, but models from other brands. There is of course a slight risk that data entry errors have been made, so do cross check wherever you can.

I once proposed to start a cross compatibility database on a local Honda forum, which was met with some enthusiasm from other local "grey import" owners, but unfortunately the forum was shut down before that ever got off the ground. it is still toying in the back of my mind though. As Diesel Accords are being retired more and more, even UK owners will eventually want to know which alternative parts suit their cars.

Interesting things I found.. the diesel wagons run a host of brake parts from previous Hondas, and the turbocharger was also used by Renault on some of their models.
Funny thing is that Honda gave different part numbers for diesel and petrol models, but while buying aftermarket KYB ( it is also OEM, but no Honda stamp ) same shocks absorbers had both references of diesel and petrol versions.
 
Top