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DIY 6th Gen front disc and pad replacement

Nathylad

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Ok, after changing my discs and pads last week I had a few request for pics.

Unfortunatley I didn't take any pics at the time but I thought I would take the drivers side brake apart today as I had a spare two hours and take some pics as I went along.

I didn't keep the old discs and pads so no pics of those but you can hopefully see what I did with the pics and description below.

Ok, first thing first, loosen the wheel nuts and jack the car up.

Once on an axle stand I tend to keep the wheel under the car.

You'll end up with this....



Now to remove the caliper you need to undo the two 12mm bolts going into the pad carrier:

The bolt on the top:


And the bolt on the bottom:


Now pull the caliper out and cable tie it up. Don't leave it hang by the brake hose!



Now use an impact driver to remove the two screws holding the disc to the hub. Don't try using anything but an impact driver, take it from someone who tried and failed!


Once removed your hub will look like this:


Now get a wire brush and brush all the rusty build up off the hub so that the new disc has a nice flat surface to sit on.

Make sure you spray the new disc with brake cleaner and attach it to the hub with the two screws you removed.

Now for the caliper. Get your rewind tool (some people can push the piston back in) to push the piston back far enough to accomodate the wider width of the new pads and disc.




While the rewind tool was in the caliper, I decided that the brake pad holder and the clips needed a little clean. You can use a wire brush, or a dremmel. I find that the wire brush removes some of the rust but the dremmel works best (I'll be painting my calipers soon so i'll write something more detailed then)




Now put the clips back into the brake pad holder and then put your new pads onto that.

Bolt the holder back onto the hub using the 17mm bolts you removed earlier.

Now remove the rewind tool from the caliper, cut the cable tie and bolt the caliper back onto the pad holder with the 12mm bolts.

I find that now is the point you stand back and admire your handy work!

Now put the wheel back on, torque back up and lower the car back down.

Repeat on the other wheel and you're done!

I've described this as best I can but please feel free to add in any bits I may have missed out. I don't think there is much missed though.
 

superste

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This is another job for me to do, as both my discs and pads are below recommended limits, and SlowFit want about £250 for it. However, some questions first (of course!).
1. The pics are missing - I presume this is an old post. Anyone got them, or know a link? (I may even try to make my own 'first timers' guide)
2. Disc/pad manufacturers. Anyone recommended an inexpensive (not 'cheap') but reliable make?
3. Nathylad didn't mention lubricating the backs/sides of the pads - do you use copper grease on those?
4. Any torque settings for the bolts/pins? Or is it 2 white knuckles?
5. The disc retaining screws - do the discs come with replacements (in the event of them getting mangled)?
Any other tips gratefully received...
 

exec

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1) I might have it saved somewhere not 100% sure but will take a look at my comp when am home.

2) you can't go wrong with OEM brakes and pads, they are usually £5 more than non OEM, but if you want to go non OEM try Blueprint who make some quality parts and Mintex also get good reviews. For pads Ferodo are really raved by a few owners on another forum. Avoid crap like Eicher and Pagid, Eicher are made of cheese, Pagid seem to wear out very very quickly! and other brands like EBC are not as good as some make out to be.

3) Do not use copper grease, the copper will intefere with ABS sensors, use cera-tec brake grease, they are specifically made for the pads.

4) I would highly recommend tourqueing them, otherwise you will end up stripping thread somewhere like I did with the pin bolts. I dont know the settings off hand, but it is in the ESM software manual.

5) I don't recall my rear discs coming with them, then again I have afeeling these did and I used them. I don't think non OEM will come with them.

You can use Andy's rear brake guide, a lot of the stuff apply for the front: http://typeaccord.co.uk/forum/topic/14950-diy-6th-gen-rear-brake-howto/

What I would recommend is that you have all the tools for the job, make sure you get an impact driver to take the screws off, otherwise you wont be able to get them off and ill end up destroying the thread. Also when taking some of the blts of like the caliper pin, remember that when your facing from the front to take them off is the opposite direction, otherwise you will strip the threads like I did.

it's a very easy job to do and most of it is logical so you will be fine. Mechanic aksing for £250 is a joke, it is a £30 job a side.
 

superste

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Thanks exec, just seen AndyB's rear brakes diy. His torque settings are 41lb-ft for the 14mm bolts, 26lb-ft for the 12mm bolts. Would ***ume the front's the same (yes, I know - 'never ***ume'!)
 

exec

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They are a bit different, let me see if I can find them.
 

superste

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That's great info, exec - thanks! I'm now whittling down the choice of disc on ebay, as that seems the cheapest place to buy. At the moment its a pair of Valeos for £50 or a pair of Delphi's for £48, but for the coupe. However, I think I read somewhere they were compatible - anyone confirm that? And any thoughts on the makes? Cheers.
 
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demian

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The 12 mm bolts of the brake caliper bracket can sometimes be really badly stuck, so a bit of precaution is required.

Clean them first with a wire brush and make sure your socket wrench or spanner fits well.

Then you have to press the spanner against the bolt with a lot of force with another tool; I've used a crow bar but a tire iron or a very long spanner will also do. Position the crow bar so that it rests against a suitable suspension arm in order to gain leverage. Ideally have a friend pulling the crow bar.

Then take a big rubber hammer and tap on the spanner (with your other hand).

---

This method will very effectively prevent you from rounding the bolt, as it prevents the spanner from lifting. Using a socket wrench while not pressing it against the bolt is a recipe for disaster, ask me how I know.
 

superste

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Good info, demian. My method involved taking it to SlowFit for a free brake inspection! Supposedly, they take it all apart and regrease your pins etc. I suppose I'll find out how good a job they do when I do the replacement. Will keep you posted.
 
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demian

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superste said:
Good info, demian. My method involved taking it to SlowFit for a free brake inspection! Supposedly, they take it all apart and regrease your pins etc. I suppose I'll find out how good a job they do when I do the replacement. Will keep you posted.
Just to clarify, the caliper bolts that attach to the pins are usually a doddle to open. It's the caliper bracket bolts that can be a pain.
 

superste

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Update: done the job today! Invaluable ***istance for torque settings from exec - cheers mate, I owe you one... I've been ***embling tools for the car kit for the past few weeks (torque wrench, breaker bar, various greases and cleaners, Turkey baster - you'll see.. ). Got Delphi discs, £48 from Autosessive on eBay, Ferodo pads, £20 from Mister Auto. Seemed good prices. Started at 11, having watched countless YouTube vids and read advice here. Still 3 things came up not mentioned anywhere... Took lots of pics, so may try a 'newbie's guide to changing front discs/pads'. Anyway, with all the to-ing and fro-ing and photography, it took about 2 and half hours! However, with great knowledge and a cup of tea comes a blistering turn of pace - did the other side in about 45 mins. Time left over to do oil, filter and sparks. Result! Again, thanks to all for your most propitious ***istance!
 

exec

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Good stuff, once you do one side and know how to do it the rest becomes a breeze to do. What were the 3 things you came across?
 

superste

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Hello exec. Yes, I came across 3 areas which need clarification and which I hadn't encountered in any guide, on here or Youtube:
1. The caliper securing bolts/slider pins. The guides suggest they are 'all in one' and that you unscrew the bolt/pin ***embly and remove it in one go. So I was slightly non-plussed, when I unscrewed the bolt, the pin and boot were left in place. To be fair, it was easy enough to then take the caliper off and then remove the pin/boot, just wasn't expecting it. Also, the pads came with 4 new bolts, which was a clue...
2. The pad shims. Again, similar story - wasn't expecting it as no mentions in guides. I ***umed (and checked with my mate) that the pad grease goes between the shim and back of the pad (and a dab on the retainer springs).
3. Retarding the piston. I used a g-clamp to push it back. I'd also opened the lid of the brake fluid reservoir (a YouTube guide had alluded to this). After retarding the piston, my fluid had risen above the MAX mark (the discs and pads were VERY worn...). This is where the turkey baster came in handy (an ericthecarguy tip).
So, nothing that anyone with experience would worry about, just us newbie's might trip up on.
 

superste

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One other thing regarding greasing the slider pins on the caliper. Some guides use red rubber grease, others use silicone grease. I'd ordered both, but went with silicone grease on the pins themselves, and applied red rubber grease to the outer of the rubber boots to lubricate it and prevent cracking etc. Any thoughts or definitive statements?
 
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